Posts tagged ‘Discussion’

The Profile image now plays an important role within the online classrooms. If a user has uploaded an image in their Profile, it will now display beside their name in the Classlist. The image will also display beside all Discussion posts. These features were added to help foster communication and community-building online. If no image has been uploaded, the default user icon is displayed.
Users’ profile images in Classlist:

Classlist

Author’s profile picture in a discussion post:

Discussion Post

Not all users will want to have their own picture displayed. Perhaps using an image of a pet, or something representative of a hobby would be more appropriate for these persons. The idea is to at least share something that others can relate to for each individual. For example, I have a miniature horse, so I use her picture as my Profile image (see above). Someone else may want to use the logo from their favorite sports team.

If you use journaling as one of your course activities, consider moving it to an online version. There are many advantages this provides to both faculty and students.

computer4

1. Instructors and students alike do not need to struggle to decipher each other’s handwriting.
2. Entries are completed in a timely manner throughout the entire semester as they are dated and time stamped upon submission.
3. No need to collect bulky binders and tote dozens of them across campus.
4. Feedback is provided directly to the student more quickly, building rapport between faculty and student.
5. Using the Discussion tool to create “private journals” provides a comprehensive collection of reflections for the entire semester. Students and faculty can view the progression of thought as new materials are contemplated.

E-journaling assignments also implement Chickering and Gamson’s “Seven Principles of Good Practice in Undergraduate Education.” For additional information read the my article E-journaling: Achieving Interactive Education Online. Click here

The Groups tool is used to create a “group” for every individual student, specifying a Discussion be created for each one. This becomes their private journal area to which only the student and the instructor have access.

For technical assistance in setting up private journals using the Discussion tool, view this video.

Regards,  Dr. Jill

Jonnie “Jill” Phipps, Ph.D.

Curriculum Designer

For those of you who teach face-to-face courses and/or blended courses, the Discussion tool can extend the limited time you have for in-class discussion. Conversation may be cut short because you simply cannot take time away from the lecture; you have to keep moving in order to cover all of the required materials. Or, you might run of time because the students are so involved in the topic, the class ends in the middle of the dialogue, with many not having had the opportunity to state their views. In either case, the student who might otherwise be engaged in sharing an opinion, academic inquiry, or debating, is sent away to quiet contemplation. Using the Discussion tool can extend the classroom time and give voice to all participants.

computersYou can plan for online discussion as a follow-up to information presented when you meet in person. This is done by posing thought-provoking questions at regular intervals (such as weekly). If participation is mandatory, I usually require an original post and at least two replies from each student. Even if you do not plan to “grade” the postings, or give credit for this type of participation, the Discussion tool is a great way to allow the conversation from the traditional classroom to continue.

The Discussion format is particularly suited for those who like to give careful thought before offering their opinions. It provides time to consider the materials and compose thoughtful comments. Many students who seldom contribute in the face-to-face environment will become “outspoken” in this online arena.

For information on the “how to” of creating Discussion Forums and Topics,  click here.

Regards,  Dr. Jill

Jonnie “Jill” Phipps, Ph.D.

Curriculum Designer

One summer, when teaching a cohort, a spontaneous conversation broke out in the online Discussion room about someone’s sister having a baby. Everyone was interested, and if memory serves correct, there were even pictures posted. This would have been fine, had I been savvy enough to have created a separate Discussion Topic specifically for this type of interaction. The problem was that this took place in the middle of a discussion assignment based on the students’ review of a journal article. The next week a similar interruption occurred when the “Big Ships” docked in the Cleveland harbor. Needless to say, the interjections were somewhat distracting from the intended academic focus.

I now include a social gathering place Discussion Forum where students can share this type of non-class related information. I usually call mine “Coffee Time” or “Student Lounge” but you get the idea.

Here is an example of a posting I have used:
Discussion Coffee Talk

Even if you do not use the Discussion tool for graded activities, I would suggest you create this area for social interaction in your online classrooms. It is essential to community building in a course that is delivered 100% online.  I have also seen it used extensively in blended delivery courses as well.

For information on the “how to” of creating Discussion Forums and Topics,  click here.

Regards,  Dr. Jill

Jonnie “Jill” Phipps, Ph.D.

Curriculum Designer

Even if you do not have formal “Discussions” that count towards the course grade, you should consider using this time-saving tool to communicate with your learners. I request that all questions not related to personal issues be posted in the Discussion Forum. When the question is answered, it is available for all others who may need clarification on the same issue. This saves a great deal of time responding to individual emails regarding the same or similar questions. Other students will often respond in a timelier manner than what I am able, and I encourage them to do this. This is especially true for the part-time faculty who may hold a full-time position as well, and are limited as to the time of day they can respond to their online students.

I monitor the answers for accuracy and appropriateness, acknowledging when correct information has been provided. Inaccurate responses can be adjusted to keep everyone on the right path, and I often provide additional insight via my comments to let them know I am always actively involved in the communications.

Here is an example of instructions you might post:

discussion save time

Specific Topic can then be created organized by week, unit, subject, or project. Be sure to provide clear instructions as to where the various questions should be posted.  Encourage participants to read these help areas if they need clarification on one of the topics; the answer may already be posted.

For information on the “how to” of creating Discussion Forums and Topics, click here.

Regards,  Dr. Jill

Jonnie “Jill” Phipps, Ph.D.

Curriculum Designer

Whenever you create a Discussion Forum or Topic, you should provide instructions as to what type of postings are to be made in that specific area of the tool. This is also an opportunity to model the type of communication you consider acceptable within your online classroom. Or, even spell out your expectations and netiquette guidelines if desired. I usually start with a general statement that explains the basics.
About Discussion

For information on the “how to” of creating Discussion Forums and Topics, click here.

Regards,  Dr. Jill

Jonnie “Jill” Phipps, Ph.D.

Curriculum Designer