Candy bar molds, a custom car stereo enclosure, and a visit by Hiland High School

Hello everyone,

The summer break ends in just a few more weeks.  A steady stream of community members and students visit the 3D Lab on a daily basis, which amazes me given the slower pace of the summer season.  Even though a number of K-12 schools include 3D printing in their curriculum, what makes the Wayne College 3D Lab unique is that is open to everyone and most of the equipment is free to use and explore.  We’ll show you how to use 3D printers, laser engravers, and other fabrication machines, then you can set your creativity loose!

We’ve spent most of the summer fixing aging 3D printers, installing new ones, and updating software in the lab in anticipation of a busy fall semester.  Come check-out our new Prusa i3 MK3 printers, easily the best looking prints that we’ve seen in a filament based 3D printer!  It also supports five-color printing with water soluble supports, so we’re quite excited.

 

Earlier this year, a community member inquired about creating a candy bar mold using equipment in the 3D Lab.  His grandfather owed a candy company now out of business.  His grandson (John) obtained a two dimensional drawing of a original candy bar design, so he loaded it in to his computer to convert into a 3D design suitable for 3D printing.

We printed a high resolution version of the design with the FormLabs resin printer provided by the Romich Foundation.  John placed this resin candy bar on the wooden base of a “box” surrounded by thin-walled plastic coro panels.  He then poured liquid silicone into the box, creating a negative mold.  Chocolate was then poured into the silicon mold to make the actual candy bars.  In the photo below, the pink mold is the final silicon mold where the gray and green positive molds were created by resin and 3D printers, respectively.  The white and brown candy bars were made from real chocolate.

The candy bars turned out perfectly!  Needless to say, John’s grandfather was surprised and pleased to see nostalgic, edible “Temptation” candy bars once again.

 

Earlier this summer, community member Ken crafted a mobile mount for his car stereo.  His first iteration started with wooden base with a generic, commercially available instrument holder, modified by rough cutting a larger hole in it.  The quality of the finished result was not quite suitable, so Ken wondered if 3D printing could help.

We reached out to Norm, another community member in our area, an excellent CAD designer and who offers Fusion 360 lessons to members of the Schantz MakerSpace.  He worked with Ken to create a similar design from scratch, yet a custom fit for his stereo receiver.  It is a wonderful example of community members helping each other with the 3D Lab bringing folks together.

We are excited to see the final, 3D printed result when Norm has the design finalized!

 

Last but not least, students from Hiland High School in Berlin, Ohio visited the 3D Lab for a tour and to try-out the equipment, led by instructor Roche Harmon.  We had a wonderful time with the students,  teaching them the basics of 3D printing and discussing careers in engineering.  Then we went “hands on” to use the laser engraver to create personalized water bottles donated by P. Graham Dunn, design custom decals on the vinyl cutter, and how to 3D print a variety of objects from Thingiverse.  The Hiland students had a fun time.

 

The Wayne College 3D Lab is a free to use, open to the public makerspace for students and community members.  The lab is open throughout the summer from 8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday, so feel free to stop by to make something creative!  Group tours are welcome, but let us know the day & time your group plans to arrive to ensure staff availability.

 

Until next week,

Tom

 

Lockheed Martin creates its largest 3D printed space part to date:

https://hardware.slashdot.org/story/18/07/15/2019244/lockheed-martin-creates-its-largest-3d-printed-space-part-to-date

NASA contest finalists show off their Mars habitat models:
https://www.engadget.com/2018/07/29/nasa-mars-habitat-contest-finalists/

 

Learn how to make your own 3D printed custom slide puzzles:

https://www.instructables.com/id/3-Dimensional-Sliding-Tile-Puzzle

Like clocks?  3D print this fascinating Marble Clock:
https://www.instructables.com/id/Marble-Clock

 

Last month’s Maker Monday was an incredible event with Dale Atchinson discussing his kit-built CNC machine.  Don’t miss the next Maker Monday which is Monday, August 20th, 7:00 p.m. at The Schantz Organ Company.  Everyone is welcome.

 

We offer a free “listserv” that allows to you ask questions to members in the makerspace. It’s great for sharing ideas, forming friendships, and helping & advising each other. To join, send an email to listserv@lists.uakron.edu with

“SUBSCRIBE MAKERSPACE-GROUP” in the subject line.

Hiking trail rubbings, laser engraved margarita glasses, and a visit to Boy Scout Pack 357

Hello everyone,

The Wayne College 3D Lab is a free to use, open to the public makerspace for students and community members.  You can learn more about the lab in the attached brochure.  The 3D Lab is open throughout the summer from 8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday, so feel free to stop by to make something creative!

With most students taking the summer off, that gives us time to maintain equipment in the 3D Lab.  We are busy repairing 3D printers, cleaning, lubricating, and calibrating the laser engraver, and installing new machines such as a button maker and two Prusa i3 MK3 3D printers.  Community members and staff visit the lab every day, usually to  print items from www.thingiverse.com or engrave materials donated by P. Graham Dunn.

 

Earlier this week, Sara from Ramseyer Farms visited the lab.  Among the many activities offered at their farm (such as the huge corn maze above), they maintain walking trails.  Scattered along the trail are stations that describe dinosaurs.  Sara wanted to create 3D printed, embossed images that young walkers could rub onto paper with crayon, commemorating their visits to each station.

Sara created 3D images using a combination of line drawings in 2D software, then converted them to 3D “blocks” with the images pressed (or in technical terms, “extruded”) into them.  The resulting STL files were printed on our Taz and Up Plus! 3D printers using ABS plastic.  This plastic is resilient to the heat of the sun.  As you can see below, the rubbings turned out beautifully!

In the future, Sara may try creating rubbings with the laser engraver using the technique here.  This method allows higher detail and text, too.

 

This past spring, staff member Leslie invited her future son-in-law to the 3D Lab to make wedding gifts.  The laser engraver etches images onto many materials including glass, leather, coated metals, even food!  The gifts were margarita glasses with commemorative images and wording along the rim.

The laser engraver includes a special attachment that allows cylindrical objects to be engraved such as bottles, mugs, glasses, even rolling pins.  The glasses spin slowly while the laser beam engraves the exposed area.  The result was very nice, similar to sandblasting.  Leslie’s son-in-law made over 50 glasses quite easily with this method.  Many thanks to the Romich Foundation for providing such a useful machine to so many.

 

Also earlier this year, the 3D Lab was invited to give a demonstration to young community members, notably Boy Scout Pack 357 in Millersburg.  The group usually invites guest speakers during its meetings and the 3D printer was surely a hit!  We took our portable 3D printer “on the road” and talked about how they work, applications in the real world, the open-to-the-community 3D Lab at Wayne College, and the upcoming Maker Faire in May.

The curious young adults were fascinated with the machine and had many questions!  It’s encouraging that 3D printers and other digital fabrication equipment are becoming commonplace in K-12 schools, sometimes complementing, sometimes replacing traditional “making” tools.  These machines inspire young minds to dabble in careers in engineering without even realizing it.

 

Again, the 3D Lab is open throughout the summer from 8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday, so feel free to stop by to make something creative!  Please call ahead if you would like to invite a group.  Stay tuned as we have more interesting stories to tell.

 

Until next week,

Tom

 

Your next rental home could be 3D printed:

https://newatlas.com/eindhoven-3d-printed-housing-project-milestone/54875

This dog was given a synthetic bone by 3D printing:
https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/dog-given-synthetic-bone-3d-printing-technology-116821

 

Learn how to make custom shipping boxes with recycled cardboard and a laser engraver:

https://hackaday.com/2018/06/19/laser-cutter-turns-scrapped-to-shipped

Turn 3D dimensional images into papercraft objects, no 3D printer needed:
http://www.instructables.com/id/Create-faceted-paper-objects

 

We are pleased to announce Wayne County Mini Maker Faire 2019!  Stay tuned as we will note the day and time of next year’s event soon.

 

Last month’s Maker Monday was an incredible event with Village Plastics talking about 3D printer filament.  Don’t miss the next Maker Monday which is Monday, July 16th, 7:00 p.m. at The Schantz Organ Company.  Everyone is welcome.

 

Communicating people

We offer a free “listserv” that allows to you ask questions to members in the makerspace. It’s great for sharing ideas, forming friendships, and helping & advising each other. To join, send an email to listserv@lists.uakron.edu with

“SUBSCRIBE MAKERSPACE-GROUP” in the subject line.

 

Until next week,

Tom

Meet a Maker! Wayne County Mini Maker Faire

Hello everyone,

Thanks again to everyone who attended, participated in, and volunteered for the Wayne County Mini Maker Faire a few weeks ago!  The Daily Record said it best: “Dubbed the ‘Greatest Show and Tell on Earth’; over 1,300 people flocked to the second annual faire at the University of Akron Wayne College.  It was a fresh experience with favorite makers from last year coming back along with new makers and new things to see and do.

The Wayne County Mini Maker Faire is a family-friendly showcase of invention, creativity and resourcefulness, and a celebration of the Maker Movement.  It’s a place where people show what they are making, and share what they are learning.  Makers range from tech enthusiasts to crafters to homesteaders to scientists to garage tinkerers. They are of all ages and backgrounds. The aim of Maker Faire is to entertain, inform, connect and grow this community.

 

Check-out these excellent highlights from Maker Faire Bay Area 2018 in California!  This is a huge, three-day event with well over 700 makers and thousands of people.  There’s always plenty to see at Maker Faire Bay Area.  Make: editors were scoping out the Faire all weekend in order to bring you all the must-see exhibits and makers. If you missed the Faire this year, check out their live (at the time) blog.

 

We are proud to showcase Ohio makers who participated in the Wayne County Mini Maker Faire this year.  One such maker is Stephen Andrews from Heart of the Tree.  Steve utilizes traditional woodworking equipment in partnership with a CNC router, laser engraver, and traditional woodworking tools to create fascinating toys and personal products. He loves to mix media and utilize found or recycled materials. New products being born daily.

Heirloom quality toys are reinvented back with a new twist. Also creating products for all ages and custom creations just for you and your home.  At this year’s faire, kids had a blast with Steve’s fascinating and beautifully crafted toys, including a “tree” on which marbles dropped melodically onto many wooden petals.

 

Rounding out our makers who participated is Dale Atkinson.  He and his father does woodcarving of different birds and animals as well as other things.  Dale does woodworking as well as woodturning.  He has turned bowl and made beds for camping, medieval crossbows, burned wooden American flags, and more.

What you see in the picture is just a sampling of what they have made or done.  His father also does long-arm quilting with a computerized quilting machine. Dale made different things over the years from other furniture to wooden arrows, which he is working on right now as well. A little bit of everything!

 

Thanks again for attending the 2018 Wayne County Mini Maker Faire!  We couldn’t have done it without you.  More news coming soon!

 

Until next week,

Tom

 

Fidget spinners at Heartlant Point, laser engraved acrylic art, and a visit from Wooster Christian School

Hello everyone,

With the Wayne County Mini Maker Faire two weeks behind us, we are busy improving the 3D Lab for the upcoming Fall semester.  We are repairing printers, cleaning equipment, and installing new equipment, notably two new Prusa i3  MK3 3D printers and a button maker!

The Wayne College 3D Lab is a free to use, open to the public makerspace for students and community members.  You can learn more about the lab in the attached brochure.  The lab is open throughout the summer from 8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday, so feel free to stop by to make something creative!

 

It’s hard to believe the lab has been in operation for four years.  We’ve had so many interesting people and projects in the lab over the years.  To read some of these stories, please read our blog here.  Our portable 3D printer has made almost 80 offsite demonstrations over those years from county faires to schools to rotary clubs.  If you’re not doing any this Saturday morning/afternoon, check-out our 3D printing table at the “Kids Day of Safety & Play” at the Medina Public Square.

 

Earlier this year, Heartland Education Community and The University of Akron Wayne College jointly offered a workshop where kids designed and laser-cut custom fidget spinners.  Fidget spinners are more than a toy in this class, they’re educational!  Kids used modern technology and vector art software to create their very own fidget spinners. We walked kids through the computer design process on the first day of class at Heartland Point. On the second day, kids met at Wayne College to use the laser cutter to create their designs. The class was a big hit and kids had so much fun.  Thanks to Desmond, one of our 3D Lab staff, for assisting that day.

 

Also earlier this year, Kari from the College of Wooster visited the Wayne College 3D Lab to use the laser engraver to engrave designs onto plexiglass.  Her designs were put on display and are titled “Illuminate: Nightlight Lam and Lantern Series”.  She created the designs with Adobe Creative Suite.  The laser engraver produced a white pattern on the plexiglass, similar to sandblasting.  These plastic sheets with varied designs were layered together then illuminated from behind, producing beautiful artwork!  We are happy that Kari found the 3D Lab possible to realize her designs.

 

An invasion of young adults from Wooster Christian School came to the 3D Lab in early April!  They had an exciting time learning about 3D printing and how to use the equipment to make their own 3D printed objects.  These students also learned how to operate the laser engraver to make water bottles and keychains (courtesy of P. Graham Dunn), created custom decals with the vinyl cutter, and rummaged through 3D spare parts bins to make their own creations.  3D printers are perfect for sparking these young minds into possible careers in engineering and art.  All had a good time that day!

 

Again, the 3D Lab is open throughout the summer from 8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday, so feel free to stop by to make something creative!  Stay tuned as we have more interesting stories to tell.

 

Learn how to use 3D printing to create custom cookie cutters!
https://www.sparkfun.com/news/2658

See how University of Akron students create 3D arm brace for a 14-year-old:
https://www.cleveland.com/metro/index.ssf/2018/04/university_of_akron_students_c.html

 

Learn how to Supersize Your Noggin with a Lens and Cardboard Box!
https://makezine.com/projects/fat-head-cardboard-box

Made this hanging gear clock with a CNC or manual router:
http://www.instructables.com/id/Hanging-Gear-Clock

 

We are pleased to announce Wayne County Mini Maker Faire 2019!  Stay tuned as we will note the day and time of next year’s event soon.

 

Last month’s Maker Monday at Wooster High School was an incredible event.  Don’t miss the next Maker Monday which is Monday, June 18th, 7:00 p.m. at The Schantz Organ Company.  Everyone is welcome.

 

We offer a free “listserv” that allows to you ask questions to members in the makerspace. It’s great for sharing ideas, forming friendships, and helping & advising each other. To join, send an email to listserv@lists.uakron.edu with

“SUBSCRIBE MAKERSPACE-GROUP” in the subject line.

 

Until next week,

Tom

Meet a Maker! Wayne County Mini Maker Faire

Hello everyone,

Plans are underway for the next Wayne County Mini Maker Faire on Saturday, May 19th.  Just two weeks away!  Be sure to mark your calendar to attend.  The Daily Record said it best: “Dubbed the ‘Greatest Show and Tell on Earth’, over 1,300 people flocked to the inaugural faire at the University of Akron Wayne College last year.

The Wayne County Mini Maker Faire is a family-friendly showcase of invention, creativity and resourcefulness, and a celebration of the Maker Movement.  It’s a place where people show what they are making, and share what they are learning.  Makers range from tech enthusiasts to crafters to homesteaders to scientists to garage tinkerers. They are of all ages and backgrounds. The aim of Maker Faire is to entertain, inform, connect and grow this community.

 

  Our 2018 Makers Are Finalized!   

 

We are thrilled that many of them from the 2017 faire are coming back this year and there are many new makers as well.  This year’s faire will host 75+ makers from all corners of the community.  Click here to see all of the interesting and friendly folks who are participating this year.  There truly is something for everyone.

 

Check-out this interesting video of the 8th Annual World Maker Faire in New York, a two-day event.  It is family fun festival to MAKE, create, learn, invent, craft, recycle, build, think, play and be inspired by celebrating arts, crafts, engineering, food, music, science and technology.  Features from World Maker Faire New York 2017 included projects with social impact and making for good, health care and food, alongside the latest developments from core pillars of the Maker Movement such as microelectronics, 3D printing, drones, robotics and more. Favorite attractions such as the Coke Zero & Mentos Show from Eepybird, and art installations were also on display.

 

 We are proud to showcase Ohio makers who participated in the Wayne County Mini Maker Faire last year.  One such maker is Chris Shepherd.  Chris offered farming thermoelectric demonstrations for kids.  The farming “connection” is the silage (feed).

Chris offered hands on activities for kids with thermoelectrics, using heat to make electricity.  Kids took-home cells after learning about them.  Chris also used parabolic and/or Fresno lens to heat the thermoelectric.  For another heating idea, he used a lantern for the heat source (vegetable or kerosene).  Super capacitors were also used to store the power (as well as solar panels).  Chris has a corn sheller that runs from a DC motor & battery / solar panel.  And finally, Chris demonstrated how silage makes ethanol. Can make ethanol in small batches from feed, then eventually fuel.

 

Rounding out our makers who participated are members of the Wilderness Center Wood Carvers Club.  Their club performs hand carving of all types of figures, animals, birds, etc.  Carvers were on-hand to describe how they are carved and finished.

The club meets the second and fourth Saturdays each month.  Learning is accomplished with members sharing their expertise and the presentation of a little project each month.  These monthly projects give them the opportunity to get acquainted with many techniques as well as a variety of materials and styles of carving from whittling to detailed woodburning.

 

If you would like to know more about Chris Shepherd or the Wilderness Center Wood Carvers Club , please reply to this email.

 

Check out the video above; plans are underway for the 2018 Wayne County Mini Maker Faire!  Mark your calendar for Saturday, May 19, 2018 for an unforgettable experience.  The event is free to attend.  Thanks and we look forward to you joining us!

 

Until next week,

Tom