Meet a Maker! Maker Faire Wayne County

Hello everyone,

The Maker Faire Wayne County is a family-friendly showcase of invention, creativity and resourcefulness and a celebration of the Maker Movement.  It’s a place where people show what they are making and share what they are learning.  Makers range from tech enthusiasts to crafters to homesteaders to scientists to garage tinkerers. They are of all ages and backgrounds. The aim of Maker Faire is to entertain, inform, connect and grow this community.

The Daily Record said it best: “Dubbed the ‘Greatest Show and Tell on Earth’; over 1,200 people flocked to the third annual faire at the University of Akron Wayne College last May.  It was a fresh experience with favorite makers from last year coming back along with new makers and new things to see and do.

2019 was an incredible year for Maker Faires all over the world.  Makezine asked the local organizers of these fantastic events to share their favorite video coverage and got some great videos from places like Vienna, Tokyo, Gent, Brussels, Seol, and Bay area. Take a little time and enjoy the sights and sounds of what makers are doing around the globe.

Want to learn more about featured Maker Faires in our area?  Click here for a full list of featured Maker Faires that are worth traveling for.

We are proud to showcase Ohio makers participating in the Wayne County Mini Maker Faire.  One of these people is Lewis Saunier.  He is a retired carpenter and enjoys building things from recycled materials.  At last year’s faire, Lewis and his wife Dania brought a pair of collapsible sawhorses built from downgrade lumber, a used set of by folding doors to make a tabletop, and 18″ stools built from discarded gymnasium bleacher seats. 

During the 2016 faire, Lewis brought a motor-less pedal bike / go cart built from his own design.  He connected with a number of people during its construction which is the heart of a true “maker community”.  It was quite a hit at the Maker Faire, especially with kids!

Another person who participated in the Wayne County Mini Maker Faire is Ben Westover.  He loves all things technology, especially retro stuff.  Ben is really smart, especially in math (last year was in 9th grade math as a 7th grader).  Ben plays trumpet and baritone in band and enjoys science, math, and history.  

At last year’s faire, Ben’s theme was about video games and computers through the decades.  He brought video games, consoles, and computers from the 70’s, 80’s, 90’s and 2000’s.  Altogether, Ben brought around 10 different consoles,  and computers with two or three games or programs running on each.  It’s truly was a blast from the past!

Rounding out our participating makers is Kristin Lorson.  She teaches acrylic painting as well as creating personalized commissioned art (for the past 28 years). Her art comes in all sizes; on a greeting card or on a Bookmobile!  All of her art is unique.

At this year’s fair, Kristin’s project will be about “The Meaning of Colors” and how color is used to evoke emotion in people.  Which colors excite?  What colors calm you?  She will have a fun painting project for kids using simple coffee filters and shapes for eyes and mouths. They will create a Mood Monster using colors that express emotions. Attendees will also receive a mood reading card to read their friends moods, too.

3D printed faces, unicorn hoodies, and a visit to the Boy Scouts Baden Powell Institute

Hello everyone,

Things have been hopping at Wayne College since the start of classes almost three weeks ago.  There are lots of new faces as students roam the halls, others from Fall semester resume their classes and continue friendships once again.  The 3D Lab was crazy busy the week before Christmas; each day was packed with community members and students making personalized gifts.  The start of semester is no different; students already made the lab their “hangout place” each day, while engineering students are already 3D printing parts for school projects.

We had the pleasure of working with community member Tad, an accomplished sculptor.  One of his specialties is creating realistic faces of Indians that are compressed when looking front-on, yet full sized when viewed from the side.  This allows the faces to be mounted on plaques, yet still be three dimensional. 

Tad wanted to make a plaque with opposing faces of the same model.  We had just the right tools for the job.  He learned how to use the 3D scanner to create a computerized “mesh” model of the sculpture.  This was loaded into the 3D printer software and “mirrored” before printing.  It took about 10-12 hours for a complete reproduction!  All of this technology was new to Tad, but he fastidiously figured it out with help from 3D Lab staff.

Tad used epoxy to coat the printed face, smoothing the lines or “layers” introduced by 3D printing.  Finer detail (such as hair strands) was lost from the scanning process, so he carved fresh detail into the 3D printed model.  After that, he created a rubbery mold so the face could be mass produced.

When he poured his first mold for a finished face, the result was impressive, even from using a 3D printed master.  Tad is also an accomplished painter, so after careful painting, adding some turkey feathers and an eyeball (who doesn’t have an eyeball rolling around?), the finished product was amazing.

This process sounds easy, but it took a number of attempts with the 3D scanner, printer, determination, and patience to work-out problems.  Tad was with us for several weeks to see the project to completion.  But the end result was certainly worth it!

Last semester, the Charles E. Loehr Charitable Trust provided funds to upgrade our heat press to a model that supports making things with the dye sublimation process.  This involves printing designs to a “dye sub” printer with special ink & paper, allowing full-color images to be heat pressed onto a variety of surfaces, notably textiles. 

Earlier this season, a community member wanted to make a birthday gift for her daughter, notably custom hoodies with a special message and a unicorn!  The process was easy.  The graphics and lettering was printed from Microsoft Word to the dye sub printer.  These needed to be “reversed” before printing, as they will become “unreversed” after transferring its image with the heat press.  Special care was needed using the hoodie in the press; the plastic zipper had a tendency to melt!  We used a special “pillow” to allow the zipper to sink into it, avoiding the direct heat & pressure.  The result was quite nice!

Once a year, the Baden Powell Institute hosts an event at the Dalton Local Elementary & Middle School designed to give Scout Leaders an in-depth look at a variety of topics that are not covered in their Formal Leader Training.  Several hundred leaders attend this event filled with training sessions and a couple dozen products & services vendors in Wayne & surrounding counties.  The Wayne College 3D Lab has been proud to be part of this event the past couple of years (and this year’s event, too!). 

3D printing is a hot topic for scouts in which the skill can be earned into a badge.  For example, see how an Arizona Boy Scout troop is using a 3D printer to create prosthetic hands for those in need:

https://www.nbcnews.com/video/boy-scouts-make-prosthetic-hands-with-3d-printers-625160259719

The 3D Lab is open for students, faculty, staff, and community members alike.  Feel free to stop-in!  We have student staff who are happy help you learn how to 3D print, fix broken items, or create something new.  Our hours of operation are posted here.  Family members welcome to group tours, too.

Stay tuned next week as we introduce more interesting folks who participated in last year’s Maker Faire!

Meet a Maker! Maker Faire Wayne County

Hello everyone,

The Wayne County Mini Maker Faire is a family-friendly showcase of invention, creativity and resourcefulness and a celebration of the Maker Movement.  It’s a place where people show what they are making and share what they are learning.  Makers range from tech enthusiasts to crafters to homesteaders to scientists to garage tinkerers. They are of all ages and backgrounds. The aim of Maker Faire is to entertain, inform, connect and grow this community.

The Daily Record said it best: “Dubbed the ‘Greatest Show and Tell on Earth’; over 1,200 people flocked to the third annual faire at the University of Akron Wayne College last May.  It was a fresh experience with favorite makers from last year coming back along with new makers and new things to see and do.

On September 27–29, Eindhoven Maker Faire brought together over 250 makers and 15,000 attendees for the largest festival of its kind in the Netherlands.  The weekend was full of celebration, innovation, amusement, and discovery.  Here are some of the highlights

Makers from across Europe came to show and tell.  A complete list can be found here.

We are proud to showcase Ohio makers participating in the Wayne County Mini Maker Faire.  Some of these people are David and Mary Martin of Martin’s Miniature Marketplace.  They produce and sell scale miniature furniture, structures, acrylic cases & display stands, and various accessories that are made at a the Romich Foundation Makerspace in Creston.  At the Maker Faire, they displayed the process for creating one of their products.

David creates miniature projects which combine acquired skills and knowledge of many sorts.  He loves to create, whether it be sculpting, painting, or drawing; using the saw, drill press, sewing machine or computer; working with pencil, pen & ink, paints, yarn, clay, acrylics, wood, and more.

Another person who participated in the Wayne County Mini Maker Faire is Josh Hosbach of Keene Village Plastics.  KVP is a manufacturer of high quality thermoplastic 3D printing filament. The company offers an extensive product line and possesses manufacturing capabilities to extrude custom sizes, shapes and profiles.

KVP’s is a family owned and operated business is a state-of-the-art manufacturing facility located in Norton, Ohio, with customized extrusion lines, in-house tooling, and monitoring with laser micrometers for consistent quality.  At the maker faire, they brought a variety of 3D printers, beautiful and colorful 3D printed objects, and a wide selection of filaments that they make. 

Rounding out our participating makers is Stephen Andrews.  Heprovides summer experiences for families that want to try backyard chickens without the hassle or investment.  In early spring, he will bring a portable coop and two or four chickens to your home, sets up everything (including feed for the entire summer), and provides a lesson on how to care for the chickens.  In late Fall, he picks up the coop and chickens so you don’t have to worry about them over the winter.

Steve is a multi-faceted entrepreneur who owned a printing company for 40 years, an organic farm for 12 years, and is also “The Toymaker” and woodworker.  Steve’s current projects include RentTheChicken.com and he & Cindy are turning their farm into an adventure playground.  Always something exciting going on!  At the Maker Faire, Steve brought a coop, chickens, an incubator, and enthusiasm and was quite the hit with kids and adults alike.

Succulent vases, Battlebots, and Orrville Public Library How-To day

Hello everyone,

It’s a busy Saturday morning.  16 teams are scrimmaging in the Boyer Gym during our annual Wheelchair Rugby fundraiser, an exciting event to watch and participate in!  In the 3D Lab, several students are doing design work for an electronic guitar that uses a microcontroller to detect the string movement, synthesizing sound from the vibrations.  A community member is engraving glass bottles and another is 3D printing a replacement furniture part for a local school.  There is rarely a dull moment in the 3D Lab!

One of our student’s mother enjoys growing succulents.  These are plants with parts that are thickened, fleshy and engorged, usually to retain water in arid climates or soil conditions.  Using Fusion 360, Nathan used parametric design to form the shape and texture of the vase.  Parametric design is a process based on algorithmic thinking that enables the expression of parameters and rules that, together, define, encode and clarify the relationship between design intent and design response.  Simply put, mathematical expressions are used to create the shape of the vase and the texture on it.  As you can see, Nathan’s work is beautiful!

Interested in making your own parametric vases?  Download these 3D printer ready designs on Thingiverse or watch this tutorial to make your own!

I recently visited the Canton Hacker and Maker Place.  What a cool makerspace with more machines, tools, and gadgets crammed into large space.  They offer tools like 3D printers, laser cutters, table saws, lathes, band saws, drill presses, vinyl cutters, CNC machines and so much more.  But more importantly, CHAMP as a group of people not just a place.  CHAMP offers classes to members and the public on things from learning how to solder, to jewelry making, to archery.

One of their popular activities the monthly BattleBots tournament!  CHAMP has started hosting fairy-weight class battlebot competitions. These are open to the public to watch or compete.  The competitions are held every first Sunday of the month.  Want to participate?  Sign up is between 6pm and 6:30pm.  They not only hold battle competitions but do other challenges also, such as team soccer matches and a first-person-view maze.

If you would like to follow what’s happening join the CHAMP message board here.  For questions, please email info@hackcanton.com.  For more information, click here.

Earlier this year, the Orrville Public Library offered its popular How-To Day.  Much like the Wayne County Mini Maker Faire, How-To Day invites creative and inventive area residents to show what are into.  There were live honey bees and educational facts about them, people playing Celtic instruments, bracelet making by the Girl Scouts, novelty and antique electronic gadgets, and so much more.  The Wayne College 3D Lab participated in the event, promoting the upcoming Maker Faire and demonstrating the marvels of 3D printing. 

It’s always a fun time and we were honored to be a part of it!  Don’t forget, the Orrville Public Library also hosts the Memory Lab, an open-to-the-community, free  resource for copying your memories (from video tape, records, film, and more) to digital format.

The 3D Lab is open for students, faculty, staff, and community members alike.  Feel free to stop-in!  We have student staff who are happy help you learn how to 3D print, fix broken items, or create something new.  Our hours of operation are posted here.  It’s a great way to make personalized gifts for the holidays!

This Man’s 3D Printed Bionic Arm is Thought Controlled
https://all3dp.com/4/this-mans-3d-printed-bionic-arm-is-thought-controlled

Watch the World’s Biggest 3D Printer Make a 25-foot Boat
https://www.techradar.com/news/watch-the-worlds-biggest-3d-printer-make-a-25-foot-boat

3D Print the Best Rubber Band Car
https://www.instructables.com/id/The-Best-Rubber-Band-Car

Like Star Wars?  Here are 45 Epic Star Wars Models to 3D Print
https://all3dp.com/1/40-star-wars-3d-models-to-3d-print

Wayne County Mini Maker Faire 2020 is coming!  Mark your calendar on May 16th for this unforgettable event.  We need makers like you!  Participate for free by signing up hereSpace is limited, so please sign-up soon.

Don’t miss the next Maker Monday on Monday, November 18th at 7:00 p.m. at the Schantz Makerspace in Wooster.  Find out more at www.schantzmakerspace.com

We offer a free “listserv” that allows to you ask questions to members in the makerspace. It’s great for sharing ideas, forming friendships, and helping & advising each other. To join, send an email to listserv@lists.uakron.edu with “SUBSCRIBE MAKERSPACE-GROUP” in the subject line. 

Meet a Maker! Maker Faire Wayne County

Hello everyone,

The Wayne County Mini Maker Faire is a family-friendly showcase of invention, creativity and resourcefulness and a celebration of the Maker Movement.  It’s a place where people show what they are making and share what they are learning.  Makers range from tech enthusiasts to crafters to homesteaders to scientists to garage tinkerers. They are of all ages and backgrounds. The aim of Maker Faire is to entertain, inform, connect and grow this community.

The Daily Record said it best: “Dubbed the ‘Greatest Show and Tell on Earth’; over 1,200 people flocked to the third annual faire at the University of Akron Wayne College last May.  It was a fresh experience with favorite makers from last year coming back along with new makers and new things to see and do.

Maker Faire Cleveland is coming!  Visit the Great Lakes Science Center on Saturday, November 2nd from 10:00-5:00 for the largest Maker Faire in our region.  This year’s Faire will have over 150 Makers plus multiple workshops and stages with performances in addition to Makers.  Maker Faire Cleveland is FREE and open to the public.  There’s something for everyone including great activities for kids and families.  Click here to see this year’s participating Makers and here for the schedule of activities and workshops.  Don’t miss it! 

Want to learn more about featured Maker Faires in our area?  Click here for a full list of featured Maker Faires that are worth traveling for.

We are proud to showcase Ohio makers participating in the Wayne County Mini Maker Faire.  One of these people is Jonathan Michel.  He and his dad built a fully functioning marimba!  During the Maker Faire, he assembled and played songs to the delight of Faire goers and allowed attendees to try their hand at playing as well.

Jonathan’s four-octave marimba is made from padauk and oak wood planks using a benchtop CNC Router at the Romich Foundation Makerspace in Creston.  He also used band & circular saws, a drill, and a belt sander.  It took almost nine months to complete the project.

Jon Michel is a Junior at Wooster High School.  He is in the International Baccalaureate programs and is active in Speech and Debate, Symphonic Band, Marching Band, and is a volunteer at Local Roots Food Coop and the Wooster Community Hospital.

Another person who participated in the Wayne County Mini Maker Faire is Chris Ryan of Ohio Fixed Wing Racing.  Chris and friends brought and flew various drones at the Faire to the delight of adults and children alike.  Drones are becoming more and more prevalent in our lives.  At the Faire, his booth showed various types of drones that are designed for different purposes.  Attendees had a fun time chatting with Chris to learn what drones and model aviation is all about.

Ohio Fixed Wing Racing is a small group of flying wing racers.  They attempt to get together once a month to race each other.  Find them on Facebook by searching “Ohio Fixed Wing Racing“.

Rounding out our participating makers is Melissa Scott of Young Living Essential Oils.  At the Faire, Melissa displayed a selection of essential oils, a diffuser, sample jars to smell, literature explaining uses of essential oils, DIY recipes to share of products that can be made with essential oils, and samples of oils to take.

Melissa is from Orrville, married, mother of 5 children, grandmother of 2.  After completing 25 years of homeschooling, she now spends time caring for her grandchildren, serving in her church and other ministries, and is an independent distributor for Young Living Essential Oils.  Melissa has always been interested in natural ways to care for her health and home and found essential oils to be a wonderful asset.  She’s been using them for four years, finding many uses and health benefits, and sharing them with others looking for the same!