National Cancer Institute/NIH/DHHS: Academic-Industrial Partnerships for Translation of Technologies for Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment (R01)

Deadline: February 5, 2015

National Cancer Institute (NCI) invites applications from research partnerships formed by academic and industrial investigators, to accelerate the translation of technologies, methods, assays or devices, and/or systems for preclinical or clinical molecular diagnosis or in vitro imaging that are designed to solve a targeted cancer problem. The proposed systems may include molecular diagnosis, molecular imaging or related research resources. Funding may be requested to enhance, adapt, optimize, validate, and otherwise translate the following examples, among others: (a) current commercially supported systems, (b) next-generation systems, (c) quality assurance and quality control, (d) validation and correlation studies, (e) quantitative imaging, and (f) related research resources. Because applications should be translational in scope, this FOA defines innovation as a coherent translational plan to deliver emerging or new capabilities for preclinical or clinical use that are not yet broadly employed in preclinical or clinical settings. In addition, innovation may be considered as delivery of a new capability to end users. The partnership on each application should establish an inter-disciplinary, multi-institutional research team to work in strategic alliance to implement a coherent strategy to develop and translate their system to solve their chosen cancer problem. This FOA will support clinical trials that test functionality, optimize, and validate the performance of the proposed translational work. This FOA does not intend to support either actual commercial production or basic research projects that do not emphasize translation. This FOA will use the NIH Research Project (R01) award mechanism.

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National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism/NIH/DHHS: RFA-AA-15-005–Consortium on the Neurobiology of Adolescent Drinking in Adulthood (NADIA) Administrative Resource U24)

Deadline: February 6, 2015

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) invites applications for Administrative Resources -Cooperative Agreements (U24) to provide administrative support to the research projects (U01) as part of the Consortium on the Neurobiology of Adolescent Drinking in Adulthood (NADIA). The objective of the NADIA consortium is to investigate persistent changes in complex brain function-behavior relationships following adolescent alcohol exposure. This program will use the NIH U24 Research Resources – Cooperative Agreements award mechanism.

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National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism/NIH/DHHS: RFA-AA-15-004–Consortium on the Neurobiology of Adolescent Drinking in Adulthood (NADIA) Research Projects (U01)

Deadline: February 6, 2015

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) invites research cooperative agreements as part of the Neurobiology of Adolescent Drinking in Adulthood (NADIA) consortium to elucidate persistent changes in complex brain function-behavior relationships following adolescent alcohol exposure. The purpose of this FOA is to support collaborative research projects (U01) focusing on research efforts across different research institutions investigating the consequences of repeated adolescent alcohol exposure on brain maturation and adult abilities. Since NIAAA is interested in supporting experimental studies on the effects of controlled alcohol doses and exposure periods, this initiative is limited to animal studies only. This program will use the NIH U01 Research Project Cooperative Agreements award mechanism.

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Department of State: U.S. Consulate General, Kolkata Training Program for Journalism Standards and Ethics

Deadline: February 13, 2015

The U.S. Consulate General, Kolkata will host a year-long training program in East India that will focus on journalism ethics, standards, citizen journalism, and advocacy through reporting. The three-tiered program will bring U.S. experts to speak and work with editors, advertising managers, mid-career journalists, and journalism school curriculum developers. The awardee will work together with Indian journalism school sub-awardees in Kolkata (West Bengal), Guwahati (Assam) and Patna (Bihar). One significant purpose of this grant is to strengthen the connections between American and Indian journalism schools and journalists. At the end of the program, U.S. and Indian journalists and journalism professors will work together on a white paper of recommendations on how to improve India’s ranking on the World Press Freedom Index. The first tier of the training program will bring U.S. newspaper editors to work with their Indian counterparts about best practices, and common challenges. Local, vernacular papers would work with equivalent smaller city or town newspapers from the United States; whereas larger English dailies would work with editors from larger newspapers from the United States. Editors from U.S. papers would discuss larger issues of journalism ethics, as well ongoing career development for mid-career journalists. Editors from smaller U.S. papers would be charged with discussing how they cover international affairs and foreign policy in their local editions, and the role local papers have in educating the public about local, national, and international issues.In order to improve standards and ethics within advertising departments, and improve the relationship between advertising managers and editorial staff, the second tier of this program would bring U.S. experts from leading news outlets to teach best practices in objectivity and how to maintain profitability. Management could work together on strategies on how to retain credibility when new media and citizen journalism is increasingly popular. Lastly, managers would discuss the best ways to recognize self-censorship to appease advertisers.The last tier of this program would also include U.S. journalism programs partnering and working with graduate and postgraduate communications and journalism curriculum development. Although this tier of the training program would be focused on developing better curriculum, the larger goal would be to build linkages between U.S. and Indian degree programs, such as executive education programs, or online coursework for mid-career journalists.

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Transportation Research Board: Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) – Using Disaggregated Socioeconomic Data in Air Passenger Demand Studies

Deadline: February 10, 2015

The Transportation Research Board’s Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) has issued a request for proposals to: (1) evaluate the feasibility and potential benefit of using disaggregated socioeconomic data (e.g., income distributions, age cohorts, ethnicity, trip purpose) to improve local air passenger demand studies (e.g., airport planning, forecasting, marketing, air service development, passenger leakage) and (2) develop a guidebook to assist practitioners in incorporating disaggregated socioeconomic data for the aforementioned studies.

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Transportation Research Board: Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) – Guidance for Usage of Pervious Pavement at Airports

Deadline: February 17, 2015

The Transportation Research Board’s Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) has issued a request for proposals to develop practical guidance to educate airport practitioners on the advantages and disadvantages of the use of pervious pavement at a variety of types and sizes of airports. Specifically, the guidance should include: potential installation locations to include airside and landside applications; environmental, operational, and economic considerations; and, a decision matrix to examine applicability of installations. Proposers should be aware of current related ACRP, NCHRP, and TRR publications, research and other available literature. Proposers should include in their research plan their approach to coordinating with TRB and other research efforts.

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Transportation Research Board: Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) – Airport Stormwater Management Electronic Resource Library and Training Materials

Deadline: February 5, 2015

The Transportation Research Board’s Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) has issued a request for proposals to:

1. Update ACRP stormwater-related products (e.g., reports, guidebooks, tools) based on a prioritized list. (Proposers may wish to search TRB’s website (http://www.trb.org/Projects/Projects2.aspx) to identify ACRP stormwater management-related research. Proposers should include in their proposal their initial thinking regarding areas of ACRP research that would most benefit from updates.)

2. Create a searchable, updatable Airport Stormwater Management Electronic (e.g., CD-ROM) Resource Library that contains:

–All ACRP and available non-ACRP airport-related stormwater management products;

–Factsheets summarizing federal and state stormwater regulations;

–A minimum of 5 individual training modules that provide guidance addressing planning, design, monitoring and testing, treatment, and data interpretation;

–Templates to allow for the creation of airport-specific training modules; and

–“Train-the-trainer” syllabus.

Note: The full use of all Resource Library features shall be accessible by users through commonly available off-the-shelf software and must be a completely self-contained deliverable (e.g., CD-ROM); all contents must be accessible within the created Resource Library. All contents should have full mobile compatibility. It should include search and navigation tools (e.g., hot links, “bookmarks”) to allow users to quickly navigate and access resources by keyword and topic (e.g., design, regulations/rules, treatment, monitoring/testing, training, best management practices). The training materials should be designed as 30- to 60-minute modules focused on each of these five stormwater topics at a minimum: planning, design, treatment, monitoring and testing, and data interpretation. Proposers should share their initial thinking on the tools that would be used in the modules (e.g., interactive computer-based courses, checklists, videos). They should allow for documentation demonstrating retention, understanding (e.g., quizzes, tests, surveys), and successful completion (e.g., certificate). They should include curriculum and syllabus examples for courses, and the ability for multiple simultaneous users. Each training module should include two components: (1) a high-level overview that includes relevant regulations and terminology, resources, and example highlights of BMPs for that topic and (2) templates to allow for the creation of airport-specific training modules.

3. Develop promotional materials (e.g., brochure, scripted PowerPoint presentation) to increase industry awareness and use of the Resource Library. Note: ACRP projects are intended to produce results that will be applied in practice, and proposals and the project final report must contain implementation plans for moving the results of the research into practice. It is expected that the implementation plan will evolve during the project; however, proposals must describe, as a minimum, the following: (a) the “product” expected from the research, (b) the audience or “market” for this product, (c) a realistic assessment of impediments to successful implementation, (d) the institutions and individuals who might take leadership in applying the research product, (e) the activities necessary for successful implementation, and (f) the criteria for judging the progress and consequences of implementation.

4. Identify and evaluate options for incorporating the Resource Library in an existing or future industry continuing education program (e.g., AAAE Continuing Education Units) focused on airport stormwater management.

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Directorate for Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences/NSF: Integrative Paleoanthropology Grants (IPG)

Deadline: April 2, 2015

The Biological Anthropology and Archaeology Programs are pleased to announce the continuation in 2015 of the Integrative Paleoanthropology Grants (IPG) competition. Prior competitions were held in 2012 and 2013. In 2015, contingent on availability of funds, the Programs plan to make a single award for a maximum total cost of $1,000,000 to support a multi-year project of up to five years in duration.

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National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism/NIH/DHHS: Investigational New Drug (IND)-enabling Development of Medications to Treat Alcohol Use Disorder and Alcohol-related Disorders (UT2)

Deadline: February 9, 2015

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) invites Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) applications from small business concerns (SBCs) that propose the development of therapeutic agents for disorders that fall under the mission of NIAAA. An identified candidate, having sufficient bioactivity, stability, manufacturability, bioavailability, in vivo efficacy and/or target engagement, and other favorable properties that are consistent with the desired clinical application, is required prior to application. The FOA supports Investigational New Drug (IND)-enabling studies for the therapeutic candidate. At the end of the funding period, a successful project should have, at a minimum, an IND application submitted to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The program supports early-phase clinical trials, although these are not required. This FOA will utilize the NIH UT2 Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Cooperative Agreement – Fast-Track mechanism.

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