Limited Submission Opportunity – NSF MRI

Major Research Instrumentation Program (MRI): Limited Submission Opportunity

 

Internal Limited Submission Deadline to the Office of Research Administration: Friday, November 16, 2018

 

NSF Proposal Submission Window: January 1, 2019 – January 22, 2019

The Major Research Instrumentation (MRI) Program serves to increase access to multi-user scientific and engineering instrumentation for research and research training in our Nation’s institutions of higher education and not-for-profit scientific/engineering research organizations. An MRI award supports the acquisition or development of a multi-user research instrument that is, in general, too costly and/or not appropriate for support through other NSF programs.

 

MRI provides support to acquire critical research instrumentation without which advances in fundamental science and engineering research may not otherwise occur. MRI also provides support to develop next-generation research instruments that open new opportunities to advance the frontiers in science and engineering research. Additionally, an MRI award is expected to enhance research training of students who will become the next generation of instrument users, designers and builders.

 

An MRI proposal may request up to $4 million for either acquisition or development of a research instrument. Beginning with the FY 2018 competition, each performing organization may submit in revised “Tracks” as defined below, with no more than two submissions in Track 1 and no more than one submission in Track 2.

  • Track 1: Track 1 MRI proposals are those that request funds from NSF greater than or equal to $100,0001 and less than $1,000,000.
  • Track 2: Track 2 MRI proposals are those that request funds from NSF greater than or equal to $1,000,000 up to and including $4,000,000.

 

Consistent with the America COMPETES Act of 2007 (Public Law 110-69), cost sharing of precisely 30% of the total project cost is required for Ph.D.-granting institutions of higher education and for non-degree-granting organizations. Non-Ph.D.-granting institutions of higher education are exempt from the cost-sharing requirement and cannot include it. National Science Board policy prohibits voluntary committed cost sharing.

 

Please see the solicitation text for organizational definitions used by the MRI program.

The MRI Program especially seeks broad representation of PIs in its award portfolio, including  women, underrepresented minorities and persons with disabilities. Since demographic diversity may be greater among early-career researchers the MRI program also encourages proposals with early-career PIs and proposals that benefit early-career researchers.

 

 

Limit on Number of Proposals per Organization:

Each performing organization is now limited to a maximum of three (3) proposals in revised “Tracks” as defined below, with no more than two (2) submissions in Track 1 and no more than one (1) submission in Track 2.

Any MRI proposal may request support for either the acquisition or development of a research instrument.

–          Track 1: Track 1 MRI proposals are those that request funds from NSF greater than or equal to $100,0001 and less than $1,000,000.

–          Track 2: Track 2 MRI proposals are those that request funds from NSF greater than or equal to $1,000,000 up to and including $4,000,000.

 

For full program details visit NSF’s MRI webpage or the solicitation 18-513.

 

For details regarding The University of Akron’s limited submission process, visit the ORA Limited Submission webpage.

Dear Colleague Letter: Special Guidelines for Submitting Proposals for NSF/GEO/EAR – MOST-Taiwan (GEMT) Collaborative Research

Dear Colleagues:

SCOPE

The Division of Earth Sciences (EAR) in the Directorate for Geosciences (GEO) of the National Science Foundation is pleased to announce a collaborative research opportunity with Taiwan that will allow U.S. and Taiwan researchers to submit a joint proposal that will undergo the NSF review process. The Department of Natural Sciences and Sustainable Development (DNSSD) of the Ministry of Science and Technology in Taiwan (MOST1) serves as NSF’s partner in the collaboration. The research area is in the disciplinary subjects covered by the NSF/GEO/EAR programs in the Disciplinary Programs Section.

NSF/GEO/EAR DISCIPLINARY PROGRAMS SECTION

This document provides guidelines for the preparation, submission, review, and award of NSF/GEO/EAR-MOST/DNSSD joint proposals. During this two-year phase (fiscal years 2019 and 2020), NSF/GEO/EAR and MOST/DNSSD will evaluate the outcomes (number of proposals, success rates, and participation) of the collaboration.

Proposals must represent a true intellectual collaboration between the U.S. and Taiwan researchers with clear benefits to the research. Proposers are advised that all documents submitted to NSF may be shared with MOST/DNSSD to coordinate the implementation of the joint collaboration.

PROPOSAL PREPARATION AND SUBMISSION

  • Prior to submission, NSF proposers may contact the cognizant EAR program officer to discuss the research focus of the international project.
  • The NSF proposal must be submitted to the appropriate EAR Disciplinary Programs Section program by the U.S. organization in accordance with the individual EAR program solicitation. The Taiwan partner submits a parallel proposal to MOST/DNSSD via its submission system.
  • Proposals to NSF must be submitted via FastLane, or Research.gov in accordance with the proposal preparation guidelines specified in the Proposal and Award Policies and Procedures Guide or via Grants.gov in accordance with proposal preparation guidelines specified in the NSF Grants.gov Application Guide.
  • The proposal title should be prefaced with “GEMT:”
  • The project description must describe the nature of the collaboration and the role of the Taiwan partners.
  • Taiwan researchers must not be listed as co-PIs on the NSF Cover Sheet. The NSF proposal should include the biographical sketches of all senior personnel, including the Taiwan partners, and be formatted in accordance with the standard NSF biographical sketch requirements. Collaborators and other Affiliations Information of the Taiwan partners must follow the same format required by the PAPPG but be included as “Additional Single Copy Documents”.
  • The budgets submitted to NSF must include only the funding requested by the U.S. organization. The NSF proposal also should include a PDF copy of the MOST/DNSSD budget as a supplementary document.
  • The NSF budget justification must clearly differentiate between the U.S. and Taiwan proposal budgets; proposals that request duplicative funding may be returned without review.

MERIT REVIEW

  • NSF/GEO/EAR-MOST/DNSSD proposals will be reviewed alongside all other standard proposals received in the same funding round and will not undergo a separate or special review process.
  • Proposals will be reviewed in accordance with NSF’s merit review criteria of intellectual merit and the broader impacts of the proposed activity. A description of the NSF merit review process is provided on the NSF merit review website at: https://www.nsf.gov/bfa/dias/policy/merit_review/.
  • NSF/GEO/EAR will be responsible for implementing the merit review process. Unattributed reviews may be shared with MOST/DNSSD.

FUNDING DECISIONS

  • Funding recommendations will be discussed with MOST/DNSSD. Each agency will use its standard internal policies and procedures to determine whether a proposal will be awarded or declined. All funding decisions are subject to the availability of funds. It is important to note that there are no separate NSF funds available for these efforts.
  • If a decision is made to fund a proposal, the U.S. organization(s) will be supported by NSF and the Taiwan organization(s) will be supported by MOST/DNSSD.
  • All proposers will be advised whether their proposals have been recommended for funding or declined by the appropriate funding agency. U.S. proposers will receive from NSF copies of the reviewers’ unattributed comments and, where applicable, a panel summary. Should a proposal be declined for funding, proposers should refer to the respective agency resubmission policies.
  • Because the participating agencies have different funding cycles, it is possible that some projects may have delayed start dates until funds become available.

POSTAWARD CONSIDERATIONS

  • Awardees will comply with the award conditions and reporting requirements of the agency from which they receive funding.
  • Grantees will be required to include appropriate acknowledgement of NSF and MOST support in reports and/or publications of work performed under the awards. An example of such an acknowledgement would be: “This material is based on work supported by NSF under Award No. [grantee enters award number], in partnership with the Ministry of Science and Technology in Taiwan.”
  • No-cost extensions and supplemental funding requests will be considered using standard procedures. Requests for changes in the objectives or scope of the funded project will be discussed with MOST/DNSSD.

Dr. William E. Easterling,
Assistant Director, Directorate for Geosciences
National Science Foundation

Partnerships for Innovation (PFI) NSF Wide Programs

Contact: Jesus V. Soriano at jsoriano@nsf.gov or call at (703)292-7795

PROGRAM GUIDELINES

Solicitation  19-506

Important Information for Proposers

ATTENTION: Proposers using the Collaborators and Other Affiliations template for more than 10 senior project personnel will encounter proposal print preview issues. Please see the Collaborators and Other Affiliations Information website for updated guidance.

A revised version of the NSF Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide (PAPPG) (NSF 18-1), is effective for proposals submitted, or due, on or after January 29, 2018. Please be advised that, depending on the specified due date, the guidelines contained in NSF 18-1 may apply to proposals submitted in response to this funding opportunity.

 

DUE DATES

Full Proposal Deadline Date

January 17, 2019

July 10, 2019

Second Wednesday in July, Annually Thereafter

 

SYNOPSIS

The Partnerships for Innovation (PFI) Program within the Division of Industrial Innovation and Partnerships (IIP) offers researchers from all disciplines of science and engineering funded by NSF the opportunity to perform translational research and technology development, catalyze partnerships and accelerate the transition of discoveries from the laboratory to the marketplace for societal benefit.

PFI has five broad goals, as set forth by the American Innovation and Competitiveness Act of 2017 (“the Act”, S.3084 — 114th Congress; Sec. 602. Translational Research Grants): (1) identifying and supporting NSF-sponsored research and technologies that have the potential for accelerated commercialization; (2) supporting prior or current NSF-sponsored investigators, institutions of higher education, and non-profit organizations that partner with an institution of higher education in undertaking proof-of-concept work, including the development of technology prototypes that are derived from NSF-sponsored research and have potential market value; (3) promoting sustainable partnerships between NSF-funded institutions, industry, and other organizations within academia and the private sector with the purpose of accelerating the transfer of technology; (4) developing multi-disciplinary innovation ecosystems which involve and are responsive to the specific needs of academia and industry; (5) providing professional development, mentoring, and advice in entrepreneurship, project management, and technology and business development to innovators.

In addition, PFI responds to the mandate set by Congress in Section 601(c)(3) of the Act (Follow-on Grants), to support prototype or proof-of-concept development work by participants, including I-Corps participants, with innovations that because of the early stage of development are not eligible to participate in a Small Business Innovation Research Program or a Small Business Technology Transfer Program.

Finally, PFI seeks to implement the mandate set by Congress in Section 102(c)(a) of the Act (Broader Impacts Review Criterion Update) by enhancing partnerships between academia and industry in the United States, and expanding the participation of women and individuals from underrepresented groups in innovation, technology translation, and entrepreneurship.

This solicitation offers two broad tracks for proposals in pursuit of the aforementioned goals:

The Technology Translation (PFI-TT) track offers the opportunity to translate prior NSF-funded research results in any field of science or engineering into technological innovations with promising commercial potential and societal impact. PFI-TT supports commercial potential demonstration projects for academic research outputs in any NSF-funded science and engineering discipline. This demonstration is achieved through proof-of-concept, prototyping, technology development and/or scale-up work. Concurrently, students and postdoctoral researchers who participate in PFI-TT projects receive education and leadership training in innovation and entrepreneurship. Successful PFI-TT projects generate technology-driven commercialization outcomes that address societal needs.

The Research Partnerships (PFI-RP) track seeks to achieve the same goals as the PFI-TT track by supporting instead complex, multi-faceted technology development projects that are typically beyond the scope of a single researcher or institution and require a multi-organizational, interdisciplinary, synergistic collaboration. A PFI-RP project requires the creation of partnerships between academic researchers and third-party organizations such as industry, non-academic research organizations, federal laboratories, public or non-profit technology transfer organizations or other universities. Such partnerships are needed to conduct applied research on a stand-alone larger project toward commercialization and societal impact. In the absence of such synergistic partnership, the project’s likelihood for success would be minimal.

The intended outcomes of both PFI-TT and PFI-RP tracks are: a) the commercialization of new intellectual property derived from NSF-funded research outputs; b) the creation of new or broader collaborations with industry (including increased corporate sponsored research); c) the licensing of NSF-funded research outputs to third party corporations or to start-up companies funded by a PFI team; and d) the training of future innovation and entrepreneurship leaders.

WEBINARS: Webinars will be held to answer questions about the solicitation. Registration will be available on the NSF Partnerships for Innovation website (https://www.nsf.gov/PFI). Potential proposers and their partners are encouraged to attend.

What Has Been Funded (Recent Awards Made Through This Program, with Abstracts)

Map of Recent Awards Made Through This Program

News

Events

Dear Colleague Letter: Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Supplemental Funding

Dear Colleagues:

The NSF Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE) invites grantees with active CISE awards to submit requests for Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Supplemental funding, following the guidelines in the NSF REU program solicitation [see Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU): Sites and Supplements; NSF 13-542]. To be eligible for this opportunity, a student must be a US citizen or permanent resident of the US. The duration for new requests is typically one year. The proposed start date for a supplemental funding request must be after the conclusion of all existing REU supplements on the corresponding active CISE award. Priority will be given to supplemental funding requests submitted before March 30, 2019; the potential for funding requests after this date will be limited. If requests for REU supplemental support exceed funds available in CISE, requests will be considered in the order received. REU supplemental funds can be used at any time during the year.

Annual and final project reports for an award that receives an REU supplement should provide brief descriptions of activities, impacts, and outcomes (including the number of support-months for each student) associated with the REU supplemental support.

REU stipend support helps encourage talented students to pursue research-based careers, while providing meaningful research experiences. The participation of students from groups underrepresented in computing – underrepresented minorities, women, and persons with disabilities – is strongly encouraged. To this end, principal investigators (PIs) submitting REU supplemental funding requests are directed to the CISE Dear Colleague Letter encouraging meaningful actions in support of broadening participation in computing [see Pursuing Meaningful Actions in Support of Broadening Participation in Computing (BPC); NSF 17-110]. In addition, CISE encourages submission of REU supplemental funding requests that specifically afford US veterans an opportunity to engage in meaningful research experiences.

Nature of support

For single-investigator projects, CISE REU supplemental funding requests should be for no more than two students for one year. Support for additional students can be requested as part of these supplemental funding requests if these students are from underrepresented groups, and the selected students are identified in the supplemental funding request. Research teams funded through multi-investigator projects may request support for a larger number of students, commensurate with the size and nature of their projects, with proportional additional support for students from underrepresented groups. Requests for larger numbers of students should be accompanied by detailed justifications.

CISE provides up to $8,000 per student per year through an REU supplement (this amount usually covers the student’s stipend, but a small portion of the funds can be used for other related purposes, e.g., student travel to a conference). As described in the REU program solicitation (NSF 13-542), indirect costs (F&A) are not allowed on participant support costs in REU Site or Supplement budgets.

CISE REU supplemental funding requests must describe results of any previous such support, such as students supported, papers published, and student placements. Other factors influencing supplemental funding decisions include the number of REU requests received by CISE programs, and in the case of multiple submissions by a single PI, the ability to provide adequate mentoring.

How to apply

PIs are encouraged to refer to the REU program solicitation (NSF 13-542) for detailed information concerning submission requirements. As described above and in that solicitation, each REU supplemental funding request should include the following information in the “Summary of Proposed Work” section, except as noted below:

  • A description of the research to be performed by the student, and how the student will benefit from the overall REU experience;
  • The PI’s prior experience, if any, supervising REU students, including papers published and student placements, along with the status of prior REU supplements received on the corresponding award;
  • A description of the mentoring that the student will receive as part of the REU experience;
  • The relationship of the REU supplemental funding request to the original award;
  • Information about how students, including from underrepresented groups, will be recruited;
  • A statement acknowledging that all students to be funded will be US citizens or permanent residents; and
  • Specifics about the REU request – duration, stipend rates, period of REU experience, and travel justification (if any) (include in the “Justification for Supplement” section).

Since a supplemental funding request is handled by the cognizant NSF program officer that oversees the active award for which the request is submitted, grantees should contact the cognizant NSF program officers of their awards if they have questions or need additional information.

Sincerely,

Jim Kurose
Assistant Director
Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE)
National Science Foundation

National Science Foundation Update All NSF Upcoming Due Dates Update

Discovery Research PreK-12 (DRK-12)

Full Proposal Deadline Date: November 14, 2018

Program Guidelines: NSF 17-584

The Discovery Research PreK-12 program (DRK-12) seeks to significantly enhance the learning and teaching of science, technology, engineering, mathematics and computer science (STEM) by preK-12 students and teachers, through research and development of STEM education innovations and approaches. Projects in the DRK-12 program build on fundamental research in STEM education and prior research and development efforts that provide theoretical and empirical justification for proposed projects. …
More at https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=500047&WT.mc_id=USNSF_39&WT.mc_ev=click

 

 

Advanced Technologies and Instrumentation (ATI)

Full Proposal Window: November 15, 2018

Program Guidelines: NSF 18-576

The Advanced Technologies and Instrumentation (ATI) program provides individual investigator and collaborative research grants for development of new technologies and instrumentation for astronomy and astrophysics.  The program supports overarching science objectives of the Division of Astronomical Sciences.  Development of innovative, potentially transformative technologies are encouraged, even at high technical risk. Supported categories include but are not limited …
More at https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505586&WT.mc_id=USNSF_39&WT.mc_ev=click

 

 

Applied Mathematics

Full Proposal Window: November 15, 2018

Program Guidelines: PD 16-1266

The Applied Mathematics program supports mathematics research motivated by or having an effect on problems arising in science and engineering. Mathematical merit and novelty, as well as breadth and quality of impact on applications, are important factors. Proposals to develop critical mathematical techniques from individual investigators as well as from interdisciplinary teams are encouraged.

Proposals whose primary applications are in the biological sciences are inappropriate for …
More at https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=5664&WT.mc_id=USNSF_39&WT.mc_ev=click

 

Astronomy and Astrophysics Research Grants (AAG)

Full Proposal Window: November 15, 2018

Program Guidelines: NSF 18-575

The Astronomy and Astrophysics Research Grants (AAG) Program is an inclusive and flexible funding opportunity to support research in the astronomical sciences. The Program provides individual investigator and collaborative research grants for observational, theoretical, laboratory, and archival data studies in astronomy and astrophysics. The Program also considers proposals for projects and tools that enable or enhance astronomical research. Proposals may span multiple disciplines and/or …
More at https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=13630&WT.mc_id=USNSF_39&WT.mc_ev=click

 

Computational and Data-Enabled Science and Engineering (CDS&E)

Full Proposal Window: November 15, 2018
All proposals to the Division of Astronomical Sciences – Astronomy and Astrophysics Research Grants

Program Guidelines: PD 12-8084

Advanced computational infrastructure and the ability to perform large-scale simulations and accumulate massive amounts of data have revolutionized scientific and engineering disciplines.  The goal of the CDS&E program is to identify and capitalize on opportunities for major scientific and engineering breakthroughs through new computational and data analysis approaches.  The intellectual drivers may be in an individual discipline or they may cut across more than one discipline …
More at https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=504813&WT.mc_id=USNSF_39&WT.mc_ev=click

 

Computer and Network Systems (CNS): Core Programs

Full Proposal Window: November 15, 2018
SMALL projects

Program Guidelines: NSF 18-569

CISE’s Division of Computer and Network Systems (CNS) supports research and education projects that take a system-oriented approach to the development of novel computing and networking technologies, or to the enhancement of existing systems in any of several dimensions, or that explore new ways to make use of existing technologies.

Proposers are invited to submit proposals in three project classes, which are defined as follows:

 

Computing and Communication Foundations (CCF): Core Programs

Full Proposal Window: November 15, 2018
SMALL projects

Program Guidelines: NSF 18-568

CISE’s Division of Computing and Communication Foundations (CCF) supports research and education projects that develop new knowledge in four core programs:

  • The Algorithmic Foundations (AF) program;
  • The Communications and Information Foundations (CIF) program;
  • The Foundations of Emerging Technologies (FET) program; and
  • The Software and Hardware Foundations (SHF) program.

Proposers are invited to submit proposals in two project …
More at https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=503220&WT.mc_id=USNSF_39&WT.mc_ev=click

 

Information and Intelligent Systems (IIS): Core Programs

Full Proposal Window: November 15, 2018
SMALL Projects

Program Guidelines: NSF 18-570

CISE’s Division of Information and Intelligent Systems (IIS) supports research and education projects that develop new knowledge in three core programs:

  • The Cyber-Human Systems (CHS) program;
  • The Information Integration and Informatics (III) program; and
  • The Robust Intelligence (RI) program.

Proposals in the area of computer graphics and visualization may be submitted to any of the three core programs …
More at https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=13707&WT.mc_id=USNSF_39&WT.mc_ev=click

 

Office of Advanced Cyberinfrastructure (OAC): Research Core Program

Full Proposal Window: November 15, 2018
SMALL projects

Program Guidelines: NSF 18-567

The Office of Advanced Cyberinfrastructure (OAC) supports translational research and education activities in all aspects of advanced cyberinfrastructure (CI) that lead to deployable, scalable, and sustainable systems capable of transforming science and engineering research. Advanced CI includes the spectrum of computational, data, software, networking, and security resources, tools, and services, along with the computational and data skills and expertise, that individually and …
More at https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505571&WT.mc_id=USNSF_39&WT.mc_ev=click

 

WINDOWS ON THE UNIVERSE: THE ERA OF MULTI-MESSENGER ASTROPHYSICS (WoU-MMA)

Full Proposal Window: November 15, 2018
Astronomy and Astrophysics Research Grants; Advanced Technologies and Instrumentation

Program Guidelines: PD 18-5115

The universe is the ultimate laboratory, and we can now probe it as never before through several powerful and diverse windows – electromagnetic waves, high-energy particles, and gravitational waves.  Each of these windows provides a different view.  Together they reveal a detailed picture of the Universe that will allow us to study matter, energy, and the cosmos in fundamentally new ways.

The NSF’s Big Idea “Windows on the Universe” is implemented through …
More at https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505593&WT.mc_id=USNSF_39&WT.mc_ev=click

 

 

Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation (LSAMP)

Full Proposal Deadline Date: November 16, 2018
STEM Pathways and Research Alliances

Program Guidelines: NSF 17-579

The Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation (LSAMP) program is an alliance-based program.  The program’s theory is based on the Tinto model for student retention1.  The overall goal of the program is to assist universities and colleges in diversifying the nation’s science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) workforce by increasing the number of STEM baccalaureate and graduate degrees awarded to populations historically …
More at https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=13646&WT.mc_id=USNSF_39&WT.mc_ev=click

 

Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation (LSAMP)

Full Proposal Deadline Date: November 16, 2018
New and Renewal LSAMP Pre-Alliance Planning, Bridge to the Baccalaureate (B2B), STEM Pathways Implementation-Only Projects

Program Guidelines: NSF 17-579

The Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation (LSAMP) program is an alliance-based program.  The program’s theory is based on the Tinto model for student retention1.  The overall goal of the program is to assist universities and colleges in diversifying the nation’s science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) workforce by increasing the number of STEM baccalaureate and graduate degrees awarded to populations historically …
More at https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=13646&WT.mc_id=USNSF_39&WT.mc_ev=click

 

 

Documenting Endangered Languages (DEL)

Full Proposal Deadline Date: November 19, 2018
Submission Deadline for Senior Research Proposals, Conferences, and Fellowships Only

Program Guidelines: NSF 18-580

This funding partnership between the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) supports projects to develop and advance knowledge concerning endangered human languages. Made urgent by the imminent death of roughly half of the approximately 7000 currently used languages, this effort aims to exploit advances in information technology to build computational infrastructure for endangered language research. The program supports projects that contribute …
More at https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=12816&WT.mc_id=USNSF_39&WT.mc_ev=click

 

Improving Undergraduate STEM Education: Pathways into Geoscience (IUSE: GEOPATHS)

Full Proposal Deadline Date: November 19, 2018

Program Guidelines: NSF 18-583

A well-prepared, innovative science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) workforce is crucial to the Nation’s health and economy. Indeed, recent policy actions and reports have drawn attention to the opportunities and challenges inherent in increasing the number of highly qualified STEM graduates, including STEM teachers. Priorities include educating students to be leaders and innovators in emerging and rapidly changing STEM fields as well as educating a scientifically literate …
More at https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505169&WT.mc_id=USNSF_39&WT.mc_ev=click

 

Opportunities for Promoting Understanding through Synthesis (OPUS)

Full Proposal Deadline Date: November 19, 2018

Program Guidelines: NSF 18-582

Synopsis of Program:

The OPUS program seeks to provide opportunities for mid- to later-career investigators to develop new understanding of science in the fields supported by the Division of Environmental Biology (DEB) through two tracks of synthesis activities.

OPUS: Mid-Career Synthesis. This track provides an opportunity for a mid-career researcher, defined as a candidate at the associate professor rank (or equivalent) to enable a …
More at https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=13403&WT.mc_id=USNSF_39&WT.mc_ev=click