Meet a Maker! Wayne County Mini Maker Faire

Hello everyone,

Want to bring your hobby, invention, school project, or product to the Wayne County Mini Maker faire?  We’d love to have you!  Act fast; the application deadline is April 1st!  You can signup here.

The Wayne County Mini Maker Faire is a family-friendly showcase of invention, creativity and resourcefulness and a celebration of the Maker Movement.  It’s a place where people show what they are making, and share what they are learning.  Makers range from tech enthusiasts to crafters to homesteaders to scientists to garage tinkerers. They are of all ages and backgrounds. The aim of Maker Faire is to entertain, inform, connect and grow this community.

The Daily Record said it best: “Dubbed the ‘Greatest Show and Tell on Earth’; over 1,300 people flocked to the second annual faire at the University of Akron Wayne College last May.  It was a fresh experience with favorite makers from last year coming back along with new makers and new things to see and do.

Maker Faires are incredible at any size.  In its simplest form, Maker Faire creates opportunities for conversations with Makers.  Tech enthusiasts, crafters, educators, tinkerers, hobbyists, engineers, science clubs, authors, artists, students, and entrepreneurs all come together to show their projects and to talk about what they have learned. It is a community based learning event that inspires everyone to become a maker, and connect with people and projects in their local community.  Yet, Maker Faire is a “fair” — fun, engaging, and exciting.

While most Maker Faires are offered in parks, community centers, and at other outdoor/indoor venues, schools can also participate in the Wayne County Mini Maker Faire because they are a perfect combination of part science fair, part county fair, and part something entirely new.  School Maker Faire exhibitors, or “makers,” are primarily students—either as individuals, clubs, classes or groups. And Maker Faire exhibits can be from any discipline — from science to art to gardening to engineering to craft.

The Wayne County Mini Maker Faire is perfect for your school to showcase the making already taking place, replace a more limited science fair model, connect with larger creativity, innovation, STEM, or art initiatives, cultivate awareness of the Maker Movement, and build school community. 

We are proud to showcase Ohio makers who participated in the Wayne County Mini Maker Faire last year.  One of these groups is the Orrville Public Library.  At this year’s faire, they will reveal their new Memory Lab!  The Lab is a space for the community to learn how to access, digitize, and share old videos, audio recordings, photographs, and slides.

You can freely use equipment in the Memory Lab to convert vinyl record, 8mm/Super 8, VHS/DVD, floppy disk, and audio cassette to digital format.  There is also a slides/35mm scanner, document scanner, and photo scanner.  Feel free to stop-by the library for a tour!

Another group that participated in the Wayne County Mini Maker Faire is Schantz Makerspace, Inc.  It is a community of builders, tinkerers, and inventors working together to offer training opportunities, group build classes, and a chance to get to know other makers.

At this year’s faire, Schantz Makerspace will demonstrate tabletop CNC machines and 3-D printers.  They also offer training classes in Arduino, group-build classes, and software training.  Join a group of makers who meet, learn, collaborate, and make things.  Find-out more at www.schantzmakerspace.com.

Rounding out our makers who participated is the Ventrac Robot Club.  The club exposes children of employees at Ventrac ages 6-14 to robotics & programming.  Last year, faire attendees saw the kits they used including LEGO robotics, Arduino circuits, and coding in Minecraft on a Raspberry Pi.

Ventrac Robot Club is open to kids of employees at Venture Product Inc.  They meet every Monday night from January to March. This is their third year as a club and has 28 total kids.

If you would like to know more about the Orrville Public Library’s Memory Lab, the Schantz Makerspace, or the Ventrac Robot Club, please reply to this email.

The Call For Makers is now open for the 3rd annual Wayne County Mini Maker Faire!  Participation is free; You can apply with our online application here.  You can also apply via postal mail and telephone.  Number 3 is going to be bigger than ever for us as makers return to the Wayne College to fill the Student Life Building and landscape with incredible innovation and creativity. Remember, space is limited so you have to apply as soon as possible to ensure that you get your spot at the greatest show (& tell) on earth!  The deadline is April 1st!

Until next week,

Tom

Stair climbing robots, cool CNC projects, and a visit with Future Farmers of America

Hello everyone,

Winter may have one final surprise for us this week as the cold weather returns and snowflakes are possible.  Spring reminds me of sunny weather and the great indoor/outdoor event that is the Wayne County Mini Maker Faire.  If you haven’t signed up to participate, do so quickly!  The deadline is April 1st.  If you have any kind of hobby, invention, or creative/crafting talents, the Maker Faire is the perfect place to show your creations.  You can signup here.  Participation and attendance is free!

As many of your know, the Wayne College 3D Lab is a free resource that is open to the public.  Come learn how to make things with 3D printers, laser engraving/cutting, CNC milling, vinyl cutting, and more.  Have an idea?  Our lab staff are happy to help turn yours ideas into reality.  The 3D Lab is made possible through donations from many people, organizations, and businesses.  We especially thank Tanya Cornelius, Orrville Branch Manager at Farmers National Bank for their recent donation.

Last semester, students from the Tools for Engineering class built robots from LEGO Mindstorms kits for various challenges.  One of the hardest tasks is a robot that can climb stairs.  It’s fun to see the crazy-but-functional ideas that students come-up with!  It’s rare that a robot can climb a flight of steps, but when it does, it’s a sight to behold.  Check-out some of these amazing contraptions.

If you like robots and how students are using them, give Jacob Melrose a call at Wooster High School.  His students are building VEX robot for challenge courses and competitions.  Cool stuff!

Alumni Ben Engle is well-known at the 3D Lab and Schantz Makerspace for building CNC machines from scratch.  Starting with wood carving machines, Ben graduated to metal milling machines and even water jets machining!  His inventiveness is practically limitless.  Check-out some of the items he milled using his own custom-built machines.  The guitar body is my favorite.

If you are interested in using a CNC machine, check-out the Roland MDX-40A in the Wayne College 3D Lab.  You can even build your own CNC machine based on one of Ben’s original designs!  Contact the Schantz Makerspace to inquire about the CNC building workshop.

Last month, the 3D Lab made another road trip, this time to Ohio State University Agricultural Technical Institute in Wooster.  Student members of Future Farmers of America regularly hold meetings there.  F.F.A. is the premier youth organization preparing members for leadership and careers in the science, business and technology of agriculture.  Students are supervised by agricultural education teachers in cooperation with parents, employers, and other adults who assist individuals in the development and achievement of educational and career goals.

During the presentation, we discussed how 3D printers work and its application into agriculture.  Thingiverse.com has number of farming and farmer inspired inventions that can be printed and used to support all sorts of tasks and machinery.  The members were full of questions about the technology and interested in the 3D Lab that is open for use by the community.  FFA members also visit the Romich Makerspace in Creston to work on projects there. 

Stay tuned next week as we introduce more interesting folks who participated in last year’s Maker Faire!

Until then,

Tom

3D printing can repair farm tools, including this electric drill:
https://hackaday.com/2018/01/29/3d-printed-battery-pack-keeps-old-drill-spinning

See how this 3D printed gearbox lifts an anvil with ease:
https://hackaday.com/2017/07/27/3d-printed-gearbox-lifts-an-anvil-with-ease

3D print an electric screwdriver from scratch:
https://hackaday.com/2019/03/05/3d-print-your-own-electric-screwdriver

Make your own digital level:
https://www.instructables.com/id/DigiLevel-a-Digital-Level-With-Two-Axes

The Wayne County Mini Maker Faire is coming soon!  May 18, 2019 from 10:00-3:00.  Sign-up soon to participate as space is limited at this huge community event.  Deadline is April 1st.

Don’t miss the next Maker Monday TONIGHT (March 18th) at 7:00 p.m.  Find out more at www.schantzmakerspace.com

We offer a free “listserv” that allows to you ask questions to members in the makerspace. It’s great for sharing ideas, forming friendships, and helping & advising each other. To join, send an email to listserv@lists.uakron.edu with “SUBSCRIBE MAKERSPACE-GROUP” in the subject line. 

Meet a Maker! Wayne County Mini Maker Faire

Hello everyone,

Want to bring your hobby, invention, school project, or product to the Wayne County Mini Maker faire?  We’d love to have you!  Act fast; the application deadline is April 1st!  You can signup here.

The Wayne County Mini Maker Faire is a family-friendly showcase of invention, creativity and resourcefulness and a celebration of the Maker Movement.  It’s a place where people show what they are making, and share what they are learning.  Makers range from tech enthusiasts to crafters to homesteaders to scientists to garage tinkerers. They are of all ages and backgrounds. The aim of Maker Faire is to entertain, inform, connect and grow this community.

The Daily Record said it best: “Dubbed the ‘Greatest Show and Tell on Earth’; over 1,300 people flocked to the second annual faire at the University of Akron Wayne College last May.  It was a fresh experience with favorite makers from last year coming back along with new makers and new things to see and do.

Maker Faires are incredible at any size.  In its simplest form, Maker Faire creates opportunities for conversations with Makers.  Tech enthusiasts, crafters, educators, tinkerers, hobbyists, engineers, science clubs, authors, artists, students, and entrepreneurs all come together to show their projects and to talk about what they have learned. It is a community based learning event that inspires everyone to become a maker, and connect with people and projects in their local community.  Yet, Maker Faire is a “fair” — fun, engaging, and exciting.

Maker Faires are a celebration of the Maker Movement.  It is a cultural trend that places value on an individual’s ability to be a creator of things as well as a consumer of things.  Individuals who create things are called “makers.” Makers come from all walks of life, with diverse skill sets and interests. The thing they have in common is creativity, an interest in design and access to tools and raw materials that make production possible. 

The growth of the maker movement is often attributed to the rise of makerspaces — community centers where makers can go to access tools that would otherwise be inaccessible or unaffordable. The Wayne College 3D Lab and the Schantz Makerspace are examples of local makerspaces.  Peer education and opportunities for collaboration are important maker tools, as are access to digital fabrication tools such as 3D printers, laser cutters, CAD software and computer numerical control (CNC) milling machines.

There are plenty of other makerspaces in our area, too.  Check-out this interactive map.  There are almost 600 community makerspaces in the U.S. alone!

 

We are proud to showcase Ohio makers who participated in the Wayne County Mini Maker Faire this year.  One of these groups is the Canton Hacker and Maker Place.  They provide a community-operated work-space where people with common interests (often in computers, machining, technology, science, digital art or electronic art) can meet, socialize, build, and collaborate.

At last year’s faire, CHAMP brought egg coloring robots controlled by an Arduino microcontroller.  Attendees picked out designs and assisted the robot in drawing the design.  And of course they took their eggs home where they (hopefully) did not spoil, being too pretty to eat!

Another group that participated in the Wayne County Mini Maker Faire is Warm Up America! Orrville.  It was founded circa 2005 by an Orrville Public Library employee and is made up of volunteers from the Wayne County area.

At their booth, attendees were shown how to knit and crochet with member of the group.  They had yarn and tools available for those who want to sit down with the group and learn basic knitting or crocheting.  Their volunteers were ready and able to demonstrate and teach basic techniques to get everyone started with this enjoyable craft.  Attendees got to keep any knit/crochet samples they made while at Warm Up Amerca! Orrville’s  booth.

Rounding out our makers who participated is Chris Ryan.  He has been flying remote controlled (RC) aircraft for almost three years now.  Chris has a passion for teaching others how to fly.  He is past Vice President of the Wayne County RC Club and the founder of the Ohio Fixed Wing Racing group.

Remotely piloted aircraft are aircraft that do not have a pilot on board. There are many types, several of which Chris exhibited at the Maker Faire. There were demonstrations of his various aircraft as well!

If you would like to know more about Canton Hack and Maker Place, Warm Up America! Orrville, or Chris Ryan’s R/C aircraft, please reply to this email.

The Call For Makers is now open for the 3rd annual Wayne County Mini Maker Faire!  Participation is free; You can apply with our online application here.  You can also apply via postal mail and telephone.  Number 3 is going to be bigger than ever for us as makers return to the Wayne College to fill the Student Life Building and landscape with incredible innovation and creativity. Remember, space is limited so you have to apply as soon as possible to ensure that you get your spot at the greatest show (& tell) on earth!  The deadline is April 1st!

Until next week,

Tom

Watering plants space with 3D printing, laser engraver repair, and a visit to Lincoln Elementary School

Hello everyone,

It’s hard to believe that the middle of the Spring semester is just a couple of weeks away.  Mother Nature can’t make up its mind with winter; one day its relatively warm and pleasant, the next has a flash snowfall that closes roads.  The weather hasn’t hampered the camaraderie and diverse projects happening in the 3D Lab.  It’s been a particularly busy place this semester with plenty of students and community members alike hanging out, learning, making, and generally having fun.

Last week, Kei and his father visited the lab to begin work on a fascinating project that involves NASA, long-duration space missions, and 3D printing.  Future long-duration space missions will require crew members to grow their own food, so, understanding how to water plants in microgravity is an important step toward that goal and for understanding how plants behave in such an environment. A key factor is that the plant’s roots need both water and air for the plant to grow well. This presents a challenge in the apparent absence of gravity because water and air do not mix well in “weightlessness.”

Kei’s current research design challenge is to design and build a device that allows air to penetrate towards the bottom on at least one side while liquid climbs along a different side. Since there is effectively no “weight” in  microgravity, forces that we would deem minuscule or ineffective on earth is magnified in space. Hydrophobicity, hydrophilicity, and capillary action are a few of these phenomenons. The designed objects will be taking advantage of these properties to accomplish the objectives of this research.

Three objects are being created through 3D printing at the Wayne College 3D Lab. SLA resin printers are being utilized to create transparent objects for ideal experimental observation. The completed objects will then be coated with hydrophobic sprays at specific locations on the object. Finally, the objects will be tested at the NASA GRC drop tower where it will experience 2.2 seconds of microgravity while partially submerged in water. If the results qualify for the final stage of the NASA Drop Tower Challenge, they will be presented at the ASGSR conference at Denver, Colorado later this year.  We are excited for Kei and glad that the 3D Lab can realize his ideas.

The week before last, our trusty laser engraver went on-strike from frequent use.  The motor that moves the laser head left & right froze-up.  The motor would have cost almost $200 to replace, but lab staff Chris found that the motor was serviceable.  He purchased a replacement bearing (under $2), disassembled the motor, removed the frozen bearing, then carefully reassembled it.  It was quite a delicate operation with arranging the brushes and springs inside!  We are so thankful to Chris for getting our laser engraver back online.  He’s an interesting fellow and is into drones, laser engraving, and other R/C planes; stop-by the 3D Lab on a Saturday morning to chat with him.

Last week, the 3D Lab was invited to Lincoln Elementary School in Wadsworth to talk about 3D printing and how it enables young minds to consider careers in engineering.  It was quite a crowd with well over 100 children quietly sitting on the gymnasium floor, fascinated with the 3D printer and full of questions.

The students had so many questions that I couldn’t deliver my full presentation, but that was not a problem!  We talked about how 3D printers work, how we use them at Wayne College, and gave students ideas and encouragement to create and invent for themselves.  We also talked about the upcoming Wayne County Mini Maker Faire, thankful that Lincoln Elementary was part of last year’s faire.  It was a great experience and the children were so polite.

Stay tuned next week as we introduce more interesting folks who participated in last year’s Maker Faire!

Until then,

Tom

Greek City Locals Help Design Street Furniture 3D-printed From Their Plastic Waste
https://newatlas.com/new-raw-print-your-city-zero-waste-lab/58090

Russian Company “3D Bioprinting Solution” Prints Organs in Space
https://all3dp.com/2/for-alexei-russian-company-3d-bioprinting-solutions-printed-human-organs-in-space

Like LEGOs?  Check-out These 40 Fantastic Lego Parts and Minifigs to 3D Print: https://all3dp.com/1/3d-printed-lego-bricks-heads-pieces

Learn how to make these beautiful Portuguese Azulejo tiles:
https://all3dp.com/1/weekend-project-how-to-3d-print-portuguese-azulejo-tiles

The Wayne County Mini Maker Faire is coming soon!  May 18, 2019 from 10:00-3:00.  Sign-up soon to participate as space is limited at this huge community event.  Deadline is April 1st.

Don’t miss the next Maker Monday on March 18th.  Find out more at www.schantzmakerspace.com

We offer a free “listserv” that allows to you ask questions to members in the makerspace. It’s great for sharing ideas, forming friendships, and helping & advising each other. To join, send an email to listserv@lists.uakron.edu with “SUBSCRIBE MAKERSPACE-GROUP” in the subject line. 

Meet a Maker! Wayne County Mini Maker Faire

Hello everyone,

The Wayne County Mini Maker Faire is a family-friendly showcase of invention, creativity and resourcefulness and a celebration of the Maker Movement.  It’s a place where people show what they are making, and share what they are learning.  Makers range from tech enthusiasts to crafters to homesteaders to scientists to garage tinkerers. They are of all ages and backgrounds. The aim of Maker Faire is to entertain, inform, connect and grow this community.

The Daily Record said it best: “Dubbed the ‘Greatest Show and Tell on Earth’; over 1,300 people flocked to the second annual faire at the University of Akron Wayne College last May.  It was a fresh experience with favorite makers from last year coming back along with new makers and new things to see and do.

2018 has been a great year for Maker Faire with 200 faires in many countries all over the world!  Maker Faire Moscow had an especially good event this past September.  It was an exhibition of the achievements of the makers of Moscow and other parts of Russia with special guests from abroad.  There were more than a hundred interactive stands, dozens of master classes and fascinating stories, presentations of new products from partners, and much more.  Maker Faire Moscow is largest international festival in their country!  The Faire was organized by a team of makers – employees and residents of the oldest fab lab in Russia – the digital production laboratory of NUST MISiS.

Check-out this great video of Maker Faire Moscow:

Maker Faires are incredible at any size.  In its simplest form, Maker Faire creates opportunities for conversations with Makers.  Tech enthusiasts, crafters, educators, tinkerers, hobbyists, engineers, science clubs, authors, artists, students, and entrepreneurs all come together to show their projects and to talk about what they have learned. It is a community based learning event that inspires everyone to become a maker, and connect with people and projects in their local community.  Yet, Maker Faire is a “fair” — fun, engaging, and exciting.

 

We are proud to showcase Ohio makers who participated in the Wayne County Mini Maker Faire this year.  One of these is Anthony Serpette.  Modular origami is a type of paper folding that uses the same shape – folded in quantity – and assembled to create new forms and structures.  All it takes is a piece of paper and with a few folds it can be a bird, a dragon, or an X-wing.  Origami is an art form practiced around the world that anyone can learn.

Anthony has been folding paper for well over 20 years and has made thousands of paper cranes and other origami projects.  He usually works with copy paper, but can fold everything from lightweight metals to plastics to cloth and sandpaper.  He likes to experiment with creating mass quantities of a single shape or scaling a project from tiny to oversized.  Anthony rarely keeps any of his projects and likes teaching and sharing his art.  Check-out some of his cool creations here.  When he’s not folding paper, Anthony is a full time geek for the University of Akron.

 

Another person who participated in the Wayne County Mini Maker Faire is David Gold.  He is a creator, manager, and worker, all wrapped into one person.  David is also the creator of Gold Armories and manages all aspects of the business.  Gold Armories specializes in creating custom Nerf blasters for customers based on specifications that they want.  From internal modifications to paint jobs, hydrographics, and 3D printing, there really is no limit to what you can do.  David has over seven years of experience in the position.

At the maker faire last year, David showed some of his modified Nerf blasters as well as demonstrated how he does his work.  He has been interested in this hobby of playing with Nerf ever since he was about the age of eight.  However, David only recently started modifying the blasters he received. Since about five years ago, he has been constantly tinkering with and learning about various techniques used to modify Nerf blasters to make them stronger, more accurate, and better looking.  He has done about three projects for other people and numerous projects for personal use & learning purposes.

 

Rounding out our makers who participated is Emma Kallenborn.  She is an 87 year old grandmother who enjoys watching the Cleveland Indians, Cleveland Browns and the Cleveland Cavaliers while she crochets and listens to books on tape. Emma has sent her crocheted items from Ohio, to Georgia and to Texas.  She also creates items from plarning.

Plarning is a technique of using plastic grocery bags and crocheting them into usable everyday items.  Plarn is short for “plastic yarn.”  It is made by cutting plastic grocery bags into strips, which are then strung together into a single long strand.  Emma’s plarned creations are colorful and useful as shown in the photo at the top of this email!

 

If you would like to know more about Anthony’s origami creations, David’s Nerf modifications, or the colorful “plarned” items by Emma, please reply to this email.

 

The Call For Makers is now open for the 3rd annual Wayne County Mini Maker Faire!  Participation is free; You can apply with our online application here.  You can also apply via postal mail and telephone.  Number 3 is going to be bigger than ever for us as makers return to the Wayne College to fill the Student Life Building and landscape with incredible innovation and creativity. Remember, space is limited so you have to apply as soon as possible to ensure that you get your spot at the greatest show (& tell) on earth!

 

Until next week,

Tom

Battle Bots competition, full-color 3D printing, and a visit to Fairless Middle School

Hello everyone,

Winter Break blew in and out of Wayne College quicker than the blistery weather outside!  During the holiday break, lab staff were busying fixing equipment, preparing new services, and enjoying the break between semesters.  Near the end of the semester, the 3D Lab was packed each day with students and community members, many crafting custom-made gifts with the laser engraver and 3D printers.

The Spring semester started with a bang a few days ago.  Already the lab is frequented by many return students (and some new ones) and community members working on a variety of projects.  We are thrilled that one of our new students, Joe, has taken interested in our CNC wood mill provided by the Wayne County Community Foundation.  In just two days, he figured out the machine on his own and is milling away!  We are excited to see what projects he will make this semester.

Best of all, thanks to the hard work of lab staff Ashton, our multi-color 3D printer is fully operational!  Ashton assembled a Multi Material Upgrade unit to our existing Prusa printer, allowing it to manipulate five spools of filament during a single print job.  Not only are multi-color prints possible, but dissolvable supports can be used for complicated prints.  In the photo below, supports are printed in regular plastic in the first object (difficult to remove), the middle object as dissolvable filament for all supports, while the third photo uses dissolvable filament only in the areas touching the object, saving costly dissolvable filament.

Visit the 3D Lab to try multi-color printing!  You can find ready-made object on Thingiverse here.

 

Before the holiday break, our engineering students held their annual, (in)famous Battle Bots tournament.  Students from our Tools for Engineering course, led by instructor Scott Gold, built these instruments of destruction using LEGO Mindstorms.  Mindstorms are kits consisting of a large “brain” brick, with gears, wheels, and regular LEGO parts attached to it.  Some students even 3D printed custom parts, such as this plow and claw:

Two robots are placed in an arena, the goal to push one out of boundaries in any way possible.  This means pushing, smacking, plowing, and mutilating the opponent’s robot.  The competition was great fun; even a number of community members and their families came to watch the mayhem.

 

We received a new arrival yesterday, a full-color 3D printer!  Made possible through a generous donation from the Romich Foundation, this printer uses CMY (Cyan, Magenta, Yellow) ink droplets absorbed by special color-absorbing filament to create millions of colors for 3D models.  It’s the marriage of traditional inkjet printing with 3D technology.

Thanks to community support, the Wayne College 3D Lab has come a long way with providing useful resources to students and the community since its inception five years ago.  Look here for our complete list of equipment that is available for your creative and inventive needs; most are completely free to use.

 

Before the holidays, Fairless Middle School offers Career Day where community members offer a “show and tell” to talk about their careers to students.  Staff members Erika Stafford, Josh Baker, and I discussed 3D printing and careers in engineering during this event.  We presented to six classes sessions of students which made for a long but exciting day.  Our sessions were so popular that teachers normally on break spent the time in our classroom instead!

Many thanks to the Romich Foundation for our portable 3D printer which has been shown to many schools, organizations, and businesses.  It printed like a champ all day!  We had many excited kids, many of whom asked countless questions.

If you know of any organizations, schools, or business who would like to experience 3D printing and how Wayne College can help them, please let me know.  We are always willing to make road trips if there is interest and the food is good.  🙂

 

Until next week,

Tom

 

Speaking of robots, check-out the Ohio based National Robotics Challenge:
https://www.sparkfun.com/news/2835

Would you eat a 3D printed steak?
https://www.dezeen.com/2018/11/30/novameat-3d-printed-meat-free-steak

 

Like robots?  Like boats?  Build a robotic boat!
https://www.instructables.com/id/Waterbot-Arduino-Robot-Boat

Or if robotic spiders are more your thing:
https://makezine.com/2018/02/19/this-3d-printed-arduino-based-hexapod-robot-is-hysterical

 

The Wayne County Mini Maker Faire is coming soon!  May 18, 2019 from 10:00-3:00.  Sign-up soon to participate as space is very limited at this huge community event.

 

Don’t miss the next Maker Monday on January 21st.  The theme is “Repair Café”.  Bring your projects from past Schantz workshops for repair and helpful advice!  Find out more at www.schantzmakerspace.com

 

We offer a free “listserv” that allows to you ask questions to members in the makerspace. It’s great for sharing ideas, forming friendships, and helping & advising each other. To join, send an email to listserv@lists.uakron.edu with

“SUBSCRIBE MAKERSPACE-GROUP” in the subject line.